48 Comments

  1. MidEast American on March 14, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    GREAT VIDEO! Thank you for all that useful information! Best wishes!

  2. Wake Up on March 14, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    I live in Arkansas and it’s HOT outside I would love to start a garden but don’t want to fail on the first try Lol

  3. sharon anderson on March 14, 2019 at 8:24 pm

    Glad I found your channel. Ppl start growing a victory garden.

  4. Akhilesh R Maurya on March 14, 2019 at 8:25 pm
  5. mrcynthiag mrcynthiag on March 14, 2019 at 8:26 pm

    Okay, sorry now you are listing some I do know how to use: cucs, green beans, lettuce…..what do you do about bunnies, racoons, and birds! They are always taking my food!

  6. E Jay on March 14, 2019 at 8:26 pm

    Thanks! Trying to figure out my plans for spring, and gardening is in the mix. This video has been helpful!

  7. Nita Singleton on March 14, 2019 at 8:28 pm

    Starting my first garden this spring..super excited

  8. Sam Donnelly on March 14, 2019 at 8:28 pm

    What a great video, it really demystifies gardening and makes it accessible. I’ll be keeping your advice in mind this growing season. All the best to you!

  9. Ieneke van Houten on March 14, 2019 at 8:29 pm

    What climate zone is this coming from? Agreed on radishes, green beans, peas, chard and kale, but beets can be really picky about emerging and need good soil. Lack of trace minerals, especially boron, stunts them. Tomatoes, cucumbers and basil are far from garanteed in zone 5. I would include potatoes and zucchini!

  10. nery colon 1 on March 14, 2019 at 8:29 pm

    I live in Puerto Rico and I love living here because I can grow all year round in my balcony. As a disable it keeps me happy knowing that I’m growing fruits and veggies. I wish that more people would do the same. Great info. Loved and Subbed. Keep up the great work.

  11. Sharifah Thomas on March 14, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    Very informational, thank you a billion! How hard do you say cabbage is to grow? Is there a way to email me on some more tips?

  12. Reggie Anglin on March 14, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    yes sir. I totally agree. man can’t wait to grow.

  13. Manic Minx on March 14, 2019 at 8:39 pm

    Thanks for sharing this knowledge! I’m a budding gardener. This is a vital skill to have.

  14. Raul Madrigal on March 14, 2019 at 8:40 pm

    Thanks for the info!!

  15. oli12345 on March 14, 2019 at 8:41 pm

    thanks for your videos! great tips! do you know about daikon radishes? what kinda radishes? i have to watch again and maybe you said. i checked out rareseeds and so many varieties of everything! is any kinda cucumber good? thanks!

  16. Anhad Singha on March 14, 2019 at 8:44 pm

    How to protect your blossoms from bossoms?

  17. Dylan Gibson on March 14, 2019 at 8:45 pm

    This was very helpful, thanks! Super stoked to start the garden this year.

  18. Keely Lemmons on March 14, 2019 at 8:46 pm

    I want this guy to come to my house and teach me how to garden.

  19. Queen Negus on March 14, 2019 at 8:46 pm

    this might be a dumb question,but can you literally show us the process from beginning to end? I have NO CLUE how to even start. sorry,thanks:)

  20. W Saucer on March 14, 2019 at 8:47 pm

    The wife loved your video, keep up the good work!

  21. Christine on March 14, 2019 at 8:49 pm

    Comment: Cherry tomatoes taste so amazing, as we all know. But since I grew tomatoes primarily for cooking, salads, or canning, cherry tomatoes seemed like a waste of time and space.

    Dumb, dumb, dumb. Live and learn. Tru this: Wash and slash cherry tomatoes, then dehydrate them. It works great, and the flavor when rehydrated is intense, delicious. Tpss into salads, spaghetti sauce, vegetable blends, use your imagination. Try it. You’ll thank me. I like easy things.

  22. Christina Lynn on March 14, 2019 at 8:51 pm

    Tomatoes are Soo good if you grow them yourself totally different from the grocery store

  23. Wayne H on March 14, 2019 at 8:52 pm

    Great info, thanks a lot.

  24. Dale Mcilwain on March 14, 2019 at 8:52 pm

    Thank you for the info. I know that radish made the list. Over 35 years ago, I had some radish seeds and accidently spilled them into a dirt filled trash bin and 30 days later with proper care. Viola! I had a mini radish garden.

  25. Donna Just Being Real on March 14, 2019 at 8:53 pm

    Great video!!

  26. Th3lite on March 14, 2019 at 8:54 pm

    i didnt see any tomatoes

  27. Lisa Lo on March 14, 2019 at 8:57 pm

    Good content. Thank you!

  28. mrcynthiag mrcynthiag on March 14, 2019 at 8:59 pm

    Would be great to tell how to use some of these unusual veggies can be used in recipes. I won’t grow some of these bc I don’t know what to do with them!

  29. covenant58 on March 14, 2019 at 9:01 pm

    Great Video. This site might help you out on ordering NON GMO, non Hybrid , All USDA ORGANIC SEEDS. I always use this company http://www.highmowingseeds.com You are a excellent Teacher ! Thank you

  30. stardreamgirl on March 14, 2019 at 9:02 pm

    Thank you for the info. I am trying to grow some vegetables on my balcony

  31. Gardening Is Life on March 14, 2019 at 9:03 pm

    Great video brother, eating home grown vegetables is key to a healthy and long life:)

  32. Lisanne Bippert on March 14, 2019 at 9:04 pm

    love the video!

  33. smokey mcbongwater on March 14, 2019 at 9:05 pm

    Collards grow fast mm. Mm. Tasty

  34. Christine on March 14, 2019 at 9:05 pm

    Dehydrating cherry tomatoes was the easiest task of all my food preservation efforts. No fuss, no muss, just rinse them thoroughly. Slash each tomato, top to bottom, and place on shelves in the dehydrator, making sure the sides aren’t touching. Set at 135°. I do this in the late afternoon and wake up the following morning to my own version of sun dried tomatoes. I’ve always limited the amount of cherry tomatoes grown because I focused on canned tomatoes. Silly me. Dehydrated are delicious, too, and they take up very little storage space.

  35. Valerie Elfering on March 14, 2019 at 9:06 pm

    Their’s a few kinds of spinach that can take heat. That need it in fact. Malabar, Egyptian, and longevity are all great summer spinaches that also don’t need a ton of space. The Malabar does need a trellis though, but its beautiful.

  36. jean skilling on March 14, 2019 at 9:07 pm

    The first 2 have been the hardest for me, even after 17 years of gardening.

  37. kristynalv on March 14, 2019 at 9:08 pm

    Thanks for the video! Do you recommend companion gardening for beginners?

  38. palmtreeleebythesea on March 14, 2019 at 9:11 pm

    many herbs can also be considered vegetables like basil rosemary dill garlic parsley lettuces mustard

  39. Steve Davis on March 14, 2019 at 9:13 pm

    Today i cut my scallions after two weeks indoor growth and im very proud today. Being over 50ish , not ever had planted a thing ever before, umm just felt nice actually even though it was a few scallions. Your video is awesome and certainly very informative. May you please continue to post such great videos and best regards from myself in Northern Canada. Cheers

  40. ImpalaMama on March 14, 2019 at 9:15 pm

    Radishes are good to grow with carrots in the same rowes….by the time the radishes are ready to eat the carrots are FINALLY starting to sprout. I love making pickles out of those white japanese radish.
    Plus I think you can eat the radish sprouting tops for microgreens!

  41. Anhad Singha on March 14, 2019 at 9:15 pm

    What about ice berg?

  42. Michelle Fan on March 14, 2019 at 9:16 pm

    Great video. Thank you for sharing!

  43. Linda Penney on March 14, 2019 at 9:17 pm

    awesome and blessing update

  44. guilty griffinTKS on March 14, 2019 at 9:17 pm

    I am vegetarian so this vid is great thank you

  45. UsedCondomCollector on March 14, 2019 at 9:18 pm

    i clicked on this not knowing the color of the person in the vid.

  46. Andrew Lockwood on March 14, 2019 at 9:19 pm

    Useful tips.

  47. John on March 14, 2019 at 9:20 pm

    What type of soil do you use and were can I buy it?

  48. Jen's Large Family Parody on March 14, 2019 at 9:20 pm

    Thanks, very informative video, but when you say spinach likes cold weather like what temps are you talking about?

Leave a Comment